If my dog has to be put to sleep, how could I dispose of his body?

April 13, 2012

People that share their lives with animals would attest to the fact that having to cope with the death of the pet is the worst part of pet ownership. The situation would be even more difficult if the pet was euthanized. Dogs are well loved pets. A lot of people view dogs not only as pets but as their children. It would not be surprising for a pet parent to opt for euthanasia to save the pet from another day of pain and suffering. A dog owner will take this option if it is clearly apparent that the dog has no chance of recovery and that further existence means allowing the pet to suffer from discomfort and immense pain. Euthanasia would be a loving owner’s final act of kindness to the pet.

Euthanasia is generally painless. After the needle is inserted into the vein, the dog would drift away. Putting down a pet is certainly heartbreaking. Some owners would not want see the dog die thus they would not want to be around while the procedure is being done. However, it would seem to be cruel to let the pet go with the procedure alone. If you cannot be with the pet, at least ask someone friendly with the pet to stay around. Some owners find dealing with the grief of losing the pet easier is the pet was seen go peacefully.

After the pet was put to sleep the next task is to make preparations for the dog’s remains. Dogs are just animals but because of the close bond formed, the human family would wish to accord the dog with respect and dignity. The decision to put down the dog gives the owner the chance to plan in advance how the body of the dog will be disposed of. Options will depend on the owner’s financial resources and on the place the owner lives.

For a fee, the disposal of the body can be handled by the veterinary facility that has performed the euthanasia procedure. The body is usually placed or stored in a veterinary deep freeze until it is time for the dead pet to be cremated. Cremation is the most common option taken by pet owners these days. All the preparations will be handled by the vet and depending on the arrangements made; the ashes of the dog can be delivered to the owner in a beautiful urn.

If the owner decides to bury the pet, the vet will undertake the preparation of the dog’s body. The remains of the dog is usually wrapped in a towel or blanket and placed in a black plastic bag to be picked up by the owner. If the owner lives in a home with a backyard or a garden, the pet can be buried in a plot among the flowers. This arrangement is most suitable if there are kids in the family that has to be exposed to the reality of life. Burying the pet would allow the kid to grieve and to finally say good bye to the beloved dog. This method of disposing the remains of the dog is not ideal for families that need to relocate every few year. Moreover, this method of disposing the pet’s body is only possible if there are no local laws that prohibit pets from being buried in gardens or in the yard. As a precautionary measure against scavengers, the grave may be paved or covered with heavy stones.

The dogs can also rest in a pet cemetery. The owner of the dog would have to purchase an individual plot where the dog can be buried. These cemeteries allow the pet owners to use epitaphs with poignant notes about the departed loyal friend. Some dog owners would donate the remains of the dog to veterinary schools.

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